On Equivalence When Translating Legal Texts

On Equivalence When Translating Legal Texts

  In a recent talk with colleagues, the issue of translating the Greek term “μονομελές πλημμελειοδικείο” into English arose. This term, which can be transliterated as monomelés plimmeliodikeío, is used for a lower criminal court of first instance, competent to try cases of misdemeanours.   A colleague in particular was wondering what the best translationRead more about On Equivalence When Translating Legal Texts[…]

Put that legal translation down and move away slowly

Put that legal translation down and move away slowly

or a legal translator’s reflections about culture-bound terms in legal texts.  If you ask a translator —any translator— what is the biggest challenge she faces as a professional, when she is done complaining about clients who compare her with Google translate, she will surely talk about pragmatics. No matter what branch of translation you specialiseRead more about Put that legal translation down and move away slowly[…]

How possessive can you be under Greek law?

How possessive can you be under Greek law?

  Legal translators translating from Greek into English often come across this strange term of νομή (nomí), which often appears together with its friends, κυριότητα (kyriótita) and κατοχή (katohí). The usual translations into English proposed for this term vary from occupancy, seizin and possession to, last but not least, full freehold rights.   The problemRead more about How possessive can you be under Greek law?[…]

The Gem

The Gem

  When you translate literature, it just so happens that once in a while you may find yourself really, really attached to one of the books you have translated – and you can’t wait to tell the world about it.   Don’t get me wrong: we literary translators usually love all the books that we haveRead more about The Gem[…]